Environmental Disease

SHORT COMMUNICATION
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 93--94

Is there any need and scope for improvement in the vector control measures?


Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava1, Prateek Saurabh Shrivastava2,  
1 Department of Community Medicine, Vice Principal Curriculum, Member of the Medical Education Unit and Medical Research Unit, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth - Deemed to be University, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth - Deemed to be University, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth - Deemed to be University, Tiruporur - Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet Taluk, Kancheepuram - 603 108, Tamil Nadu
India

Abstract

Owing to the rapid and unplanned urbanization, varying use of lands, and an exponential rise in trade and global travel, the number of opportunities for a vector contact with humans has significantly increased. In fact, the recent global estimates depict that in excess of four-fifth of the world's population is at risk of at least one or more vector-borne diseases (VBDs). All these factors together justify the need for an urgent and a holistic approach to minimize the incidence and impact of VBDs. Systematic analyses of the existing vector control measures indicate that there is an immense scope to ameliorate the impact of vector control. In conclusion, there is a big-time need for having a collaborative and coordinated response for the containment of VBD worldwide, and thus, all the stakeholders should work together for the achievement of the same.



How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Is there any need and scope for improvement in the vector control measures?.Environ Dis 2019;4:93-94


How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Is there any need and scope for improvement in the vector control measures?. Environ Dis [serial online] 2019 [cited 2022 Oct 6 ];4:93-94
Available from: http://www.environmentmed.org/text.asp?2019/4/4/93/274521


Full Text



 Introduction



Owing to the rapid and unplanned urbanization, varying use of lands, and an exponential rise in trade and global travel, the number of opportunities for a vector contact with humans has significantly increased.[1] In addition, the climate deterioration and environmental attributes have also helped in bringing about a rise in the incidence of vector-borne diseases (VBDs) among humans.[1],[2] The epidemiological distribution suggests that VBDs are not only limited to tropical regions but have even been observed in temperate settings.[1]

Distribution and consequences

In fact, the recent global estimates depict that in excess of four-fifth of the world's population is at risk of at least one or more VBDs.[1] Moreover, 0.7 million deaths each year have been attributed to these diseases.[1] Further, global spread of dengue and chikungunya viruses has been reported across the world. In addition, recent outbreaks of Zika virus and yellow fever have also been reported, which clearly reflect that most of the nations are not yet prepared enough to deal with this set of diseases.[2],[3],[4] Furthermore, the financial burden attributed to these diseases on the health care delivery system and the society (viz., diagnosis, treatment, sickness absenteeism, and cost of buying personal protective measures) can also not be ignored.[3],[4]

Need for mounting an effective response

All these factors together justify the need for an urgent and a holistic approach to minimize the incidence and impact of VBDs.[1] There is an immense need to realign the national programs, and thus, health systems must be prepared (in terms of adequate health-care professionals, diagnostic support, availability of medications, etc.) to eventually mount a better health sector response.[2],[3] With regard to vector control, an integrated vector management is the best approach, wherein simultaneously strengthening the infrastructure and environmental control is also advocated.[3],[4] In addition, the emphasis has to be given toward awareness campaigns and health education sessions, so that community participation is also ensured.[5],[6]

Strengthening of the prevention and control measures

Systematic analyses of the existing vector control measures indicate that there is an immense scope to ameliorate the impact of vector control.[1],[7] There is a definite scope to reduce poverty and improve the living standards and environmental attributes in urban areas, which will surely reduce the chances of vector breeding and thus a reduction in the incidence of disease.[1],[2],[7] Then, the problem has to be given due recognition by all the involved stakeholders, and it is a must to expand the vector control measures for different VBDs.[2],[3],[4] Further, efforts have to be taken to promote multisectoral collaboration and involvement of different partners for having a better control.[3],[4],[6],[7]

Furthermore, based on the local sociodemographic and environmental factors, the program managers should support customized approaches.[4],[5] In addition, there is a great need to promote research and adopt innovations (like the use of new insecticides or biocontrol measures or genetic modification, etc.) in having a better vector control response.[1] Moreover, having a support of technologies to ensure real-time data collection or use of geographical information system can aid in having a better response.[1],[2],[3]

 Conclusion



There is a big-time need for having a collaborative and coordinated response for the containment of VBD worldwide, and thus, all the stakeholders should work together for the achievement of the same.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1World Health Organization. Global vector control response 2017-2030. Geneva: World Health Organization press; 2017. p. 1-13.
2Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Striving forward towards malaria elimination and the necessity to be persistent in our efforts. Healthc Low Resour Settings 2016;4:5755.
3Alonso P, Engels D, Reeder J. Renewed Push to Strengthen Vector Control Globally; 2017. Available from: http://who.int/mediacentre/commentaries/strengthen-vector-control/en/. [Last accessed on 2019 Jun 11].
4Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Exploring the geographical burden and responding to the threat of the spread of dengue infection to the unaffected nations. Ann Trop Med Public Health 2017;10:481-2.
5Swana EK, Makan GY, Mukeng CK, Mupumba HI, Kalaba GM, Luboya ON, et al. Feasibility and implementation of community-based malaria case management with integrated vector control in the democratic republic of congo. Malar J 2016;15:413.
6Sulistyawati S, Dwi Astuti F, Rahmah Umniyati S, Tunggul Satoto TB, Lazuardi L, Nilsson M, et al. Dengue vector control through community empowerment: Lessons learned from a community-based study in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Int J Environ Res Public Health 2019;16. pii: E1013.
7Piltch-Loeb R, Merdjanoff AA, Bhanja A, Abramson DM. Support for vector control strategies in the United States during the Zika outbreak in 2016: The role of risk perception, knowledge, and confidence in government. Prev Med 2019;119:52-7.