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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 57-62

Particulate air pollution: Major research methods and applications in animal models


1 Division of Environmental Health Sciences, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA
2 Division of Environmental Health Sciences, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University; Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute College of Medicine, The Ohio State University; Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Qinghua Sun
Division of Environmental Health Sciences, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ed.ed_16_18

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Ambient air pollution is composed of a heterogeneous mixture of gaseous and solid particle compounds in which primary particles are emitted directly into the atmosphere, such as diesel soot, while secondary particles are created through physicochemical transformation. Particulate matter (PM), especially fine and ultrafine particles, can be inhaled and deposited in the alveolar cavities and penetrate into circulation. An association between high levels of air pollutants and human disease has been known for more than half a century and increasing evidence demonstrates a strong link between exposure on PM and the development of systemic diseases such as cardiovascular and neurological disorders. Experimental animal models have been extensively used to study the underlying mechanism caused by environmental exposure to ambient PM. Due to their availability, quality, cost, and genetically modified strains, rodent models have been widely used. Some common exposure approaches include intranasal instillation, intratracheal instillation, nose-only inhalation, whole-body inhalation, and intravenous injection have been reviewed with a brief summary of its performance, merit, limitation, and application. We hope this would provide a useful reference in advancing experimental researches about air pollution human health and disease development.


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